Category Archives: Teachers

Photos and tips from teachers for Teacher Appreciation Month during the month of May at Stained Glass Express

PAINT POURS—THE RAGE!

Paint pours are one of the most fun, exciting things to come along in our industry in a while.  It is easy, and the results are amazing.

Many people are doing this on canvas with acrylic paints, but in this industry we are going it on glass with enamel paints that can be fired.

To do one of these projects you need:  paints, layering mix, little cups, stir sticks, butane torch (optional), tray for catching the paint.

https://www.stainedglassexpress.com/glass-paint-layering-mix-8-oz-.html

https://www.stainedglassexpress.com/painting-markers/colors-for-earth-glass-enamels/

Some of the terminology you will hear are as follows:

Dirty Pour.  You pour/layer your paint in a cup and then set the glass on top of the cup and flip it over.  Let the colors slide down and then lift the cup.  So many variations.  You can slide the cup around before picking it up or tilt it.  After the cup is off you can blow with a straw or blow with the butane, drag something through it.  You can also just kind of sling/dump the paint from the cup.  Use more than one cup.

Straight pour:  Paint is poured/drizzled/dropped on the surface one at a time.   Then you can use the variations above.

Once the color is all over the surface you can wait a bit and then gently skin over the wet surface using an old credit card, palette, knife, fan brush etc.  You can use the butane to bring up bubbles or pop air bubbles.

Other fun things are to use a colander for pouring, or a sifter to sift dry powdered color on a wet base, a slotted spoon to create patterns, funnel to create pours.  Let your imagination run wild!

 

 

SIMAX

For a few years now, Stained Glass Express has been offering 33 coe glass.  We are still learning and still adding product.  One of the growing stock is our 33 coe tubes and rods.  We stock Simax tubes and rods made by Schott.  This is a high- quality borosilicate glass.  The main ingredients are silica and boron.  Boro has a high heat resistance and a low thermal expansion.  (thus the low coe number).

Simax works best in high heat and is commonly used in lab equipment, industrial equipment and cookware.  However, in our art world it is a favorite because it creates smoot, transparent and strong beautiful pieces.

For Simax to work at it’s full potential it must be annealed properly.  Annealing is the process of eliminating internal thermal stress.  This stress comes from one area of the glass getting hotter than a neighboring area and will later develop cracks.  Usually it is annealed at 1050 F for about one hour and then cooled slowly.  If you cool too quickly it will crack.  Of course, this can vary depending on the thickness of the glass and other variables.

You can use Simax glass with other 33 coe glass like Glass Alchemy, Golden Gate, imported, Momkas, Northstar, Tautman and others.

We have not put simax on our website but if you talk to us and allow us to cut it to fit a box (or are willing to pay for oversized we will ship it.  Our colored rods are on the site.   https://www.stainedglassexpress.com/flameworking_glassblowing/33-coe/

 

In the art world the top item made is tobacco pipes, but also ornaments, pendants and other wonderful works of art!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sign up for one of our torch room classes and learn this art!  https://www.stainedglassexpress.com/skins/common/images/TorchRoomClassesSchedule.pdf

 

WISTERIA!

 


INFO FROM THE MORSE MUSEUM

This lamp is not only incredibly beautiful and an amazing amount of work, it was turning point for the Tiffany Studios.  In 1902, there was an event in Turin, Italy called the Prima Esposizione, Internazionale d’Arte Decorative Moderna.  This event put an emphasis on the aesthetic renewal of everyday objects.  Tiffany Studios received a grand prize at this event.  One of the designs for the award was for the Wisteria Library Lamp.  Electricity was now available.  Before electricity, the lamp bases had to serve as containers for oil and limited the design.  This transformed a previously utilitarian device in an electrified sculpture.

Take a close look at the top of the lamp.  There is an intricate bronze vine working its way down the design of the lamp.  Just beautiful.  This shade was designed by Clara Driscoll, who was the supervisor in the Women’s Glass Cutting Department.  Follow this link to learn more about Clara Driscoll.  http://morsemuseum.org/louis-comfort-tiffany/tiffany-studios-designers.

Wisteria has more than 2,000 pieces which, of course, were hand cut.  The wisteria was a popular spring blooming vine in the 19th-century American gardens and loved by Louis Comfort Tiffany.  He planted them in abundance at his Long Island estate called Laurelton Hall.