MICA ILLUSIONS TRANSFERS

MICA ILLUSION TRANSFERS

Illusions transfers are 3×3 transfers than come in Silver, Champagne and Gold. They are new to the market and we will be introducing them at Stained Glass Express in April. (2018)

 

Will work on any coe.  Not for food bearing surfaces.

The white parts of the stencils is where your glass will show. The color part is actual mica backed with enamel, so it adheres to the glass.  Fires at lowest possible.  If you fire too high the mica will adhere too much to the glass in the negative areas because the glass is softening.

You don’t have to use dichroic glass for these because the mica is so awesome. You could do it on anything. Clear, dichroic or anything!  Experiment. These samples are on black glass.  They are hi fire decals.  1250F to 1300F.

Glass MUST BE pre fused. Then add the mica transfer.

Remove the wax carrier

Soak the transfer in distilled water take off the backing and apply to your fired cabochon.

Smooth out air bubbles with paper towel.

Let dry. 3 hours might be enough, but you probably should do over night

 

 

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DICHROIC GLASS

DICHROIC GLASS

MOST INFO FROM HOWARD SANDBERG OF COATINGS BY SANDBERG

Dichroic glass is one of the most beautiful things SGE carries and it has been one of the most challenging.  It was kind of nice to see on CBS page “the history of dichroic glass” that Howard says, “When you look at the history of an artist using Dichroic coated glass, it appears that the artist has been under the major handicap of not having any information on what he or she was working with.  These artists were exposed to a piece of glass that had interesting color effects but came from a very complex and scientific industry not easily understood.  These ‘high-tech’ coatings were capable of reflecting a narrow band of light (or one color) and at the same time, transmitting the remaining part of light.”  So at least it was not just us facing challenges.

I could go on about how the development of this metal film was done by our military and aerospace industries.  The text would make your head hurt!  It was 30 years (mid 70s) ago when CBS started production for art applications.

When SGE first brought in some dichroic glass it was a big deal.  We made a special display rack for it.  We were displaying 1 piece that was about 2×4 inches of each one.  We outgrew that fast!

Then we would get questions about what it was going to do.  We had some idea but not much.  To complicate things, we didn’t even always know what we were getting.  A customer would buy a piece that was rainbow or mixed and one part of the glass would behave one way and another part another way.  Then our suppliers started to drill down and offer a standard stock and good descriptions.

We changed our sku system and our descriptions to help our customers know what they were buying and to help us have them organized in a way that the customer could find what they wanted, and we would have a way to see gaps in our inventory and keep our stock consistent.

About five years into stocking this glass we bought a shrink wrap machine.  We bring in the glass, cut it, shrink wrap it and label it.  No more ruined pieces from scratches and no more fighting to get the glue from the label off the glass.

We stock CBS (Coatings by Sandberg), Profusion, and Austin Thin Films.  We stock both 90 and 96.

Just recently we have started to look into stocking some 104 and 33 coe for out bead workers and glass blowers.

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A THOUSAND CRANES

A THOUSAND CRANES

Info from Glass Art Magazine and Wikipedia

Japanese legend is that if you fold 1000 cranes you will be granted a wish by the gods.  The crane is a symbol of happiness and eternal youth so some believe that the 1000 origami paper cranes will bring you long life or recovery from illness or injury.  In Japan the cranes which are strung together are very popular as wedding themes.

GERM’S 1000 CRANES PROJECT

Jeremy Grant-Levine (aka Germ) in  2018 is glass blowing 1000 cranes.  Jeremy is being back by $92,000 Kickstarter campaign.  This project will take 250 pounds of glass and approximately two miles of wire, totaling $20,000 in materials.  When complete the work will on display at the Arch Enemy Arts gallery in Philadelphia.

Jeremy is based in Philadelphia and has been flameworking glass pipes for over 13 years.  He has exhibited at galleries in Philadelphia, Seattle, New York, Miami and Tel Aviv.

 

 

 

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HOW TO BUY A KILN

BUYING A KILN

It is a big decision.  It is a lot of money.  It is a big piece of equipment that will take up space.  There really is a lot to consider.

  • How much space do you have
  • Do you want to go to the expense of 220 line or get by with what you already have?
  • Size of the kiln
  • Programming

We sell Olympic Kilns at Stained Glass Express.  www.greatkilns.com.   We love their support and we love the kilns.  Basically, you have a box made of firebrick that is attached to a controller.  So the support piece is BIG.

For your workspace you should be prepared to make it a fire proof space.  Easily done.  Flame resistant sheetrock or metal set away from the wall.  Put it on something that won’t burn.  Common sense kind of stuff.  Don’t burn your house down.

The big difference between having a 110 line and a 220 is the depth of the kiln.  When there are two elements in the kiln you can run it on a 110 line.  You just have to change the outlet to accommodate the commercial plug.

Consider what you want to make.  Jewelry and little dishes.  You are good with a little kiln.  If you think BIG, you will need a bigger kiln.  Maybe one with a clamshell feature so that it opens from the top and the bottom.  You can get one that bottom slides out.  Features to consider when thinking about putting things in the kiln and getting them back out.

If you want to do tall things like a drape lamp shade or vase you should consider bringing in that 220 line.  The 220 allows the kiln to have three elements and therefore it can be deeper.

Everyone I know, recommends upgrading to a digital controller.  One where you can save multiple programs.  We sell the RTC-1000 with great results.  We can store 6 programs which pretty much covers everything.

What you definitely do not want is one that you have to babysit and make sure it gets turned off.  You run around with a timer around your neck (seriously) and I have heard terrible results of kilns burning through when someone went to bed and forgot.

One more thing to put into your brain.  If you think you ever might get into glass blowing or bead making you might consider a kiln with a punty door that you can use to anneal your beads.

To see what Stained Glass Express offers https://www.stainedglassexpress.com/fusing_supplies/kilns-and-accessories/

 

 

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PANEL C

PANEL C  1908

For those of you who read this blog consistently, you know I am a fan of the Morse Museum.  The Morse is in the college town of Winter Park, Fl.  They have an extensive collection of Tiffany art work.

This is part of the collection that was feature in this month’s newsletter.  The panel was originally the center piece of a 10-panel window designed for the landing of a massive marble staircase in the Pittsburg home Of Richard B. Mellon.  The panel was divided up when the 60-room house was demolished in 1940.

The piece is done totally in opalescent glass.  It must have been a remarkable sight at the top of the equally remarkable marble staircase.

 

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Stained Glass Music

This morning on my iPad the banner floated by that said:

MOZART

Station

Happy Birthday Mozart

Celebrate with this station of the composer’s greats

Concerned that I missed Mozart’s birthday, (it did not come up on my Facebook page) I looked it up.  Mozart was born January 27, 1756.  So, I missed it by a little (I am writing this on Feb 1st) so I will celebrate now.  First, I am listening to his music right now.  Second, I am posting this piece of stained glass art.

This is called Musicali Tree by Carol Korfin in San Diego, CA

When I took this picture it was on display at the fallbrook art Center

www.fallbrookartcenter.org

 

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Tips from the Glass Academy: Art Rules!

I stumbled upon a website that listed some art rules.  They really were for painting, but they sure could be adapted to any area of art including glass art.  The name of the site is www.thoughtco.com.

  1. RULE OF THIRDS

Divide your surface into thirds and place your focus either one-third across or one-third up or down.  Where the lines intersect.

To see the difference, look at the lions.  The one on the left your eye is drawn into the center and you tend to ignore the rest.  On the right example, where the lion’s face is using the rules of thirds your eye is drawn to the lion face and around the painting following the curve of the body.

 

2. RULE OF ODDS

When designing you should first decide how many elements will be in the piece.  One way to make the piece more dynamic is have odd numbers.  Having an odd number does not allow your brain to pair and group which keeps your eyes moving.  In the top picture below your eye/brain pairs up the tress but in the lower examples it shows a more dynamic picture.

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Tips from the Glass Academy: Double Helix – Reduction Guide

Info from Double Helix

The Reducing Sequence:

Work in a neutral flame

Cool until the glow is gone

Create a reduction flame by reducing the oxygen, increasing the propane, or both

Gently reheat in the reduction flame

Experiment with the length of the reduction time and/or repeating the sequence to create different effects.

An oxidizing flame can be used to “erase” some of the reduction effects.

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How to use the Color of the Year – Ultra Violet

This info is all from the Pantone website

We have created eight different color palettes that feature PANTONE 18-3838 Ultra Violet to help you bring this year’s special shade into your designs. All color bases are covered; brights, deeper hues, pastels, mid-tones, and metallics. With Ultra Violet as a versatile trans-seasonal and gender-neutral anchor in every palette, each of the eight palettes conveys its own distinctive feeling and mood and can easily cross-over fashion and accessories, beauty, home interiors, and graphic design applications.

To further inspire your creative juices, within each of these eight color stories we have also included three suggested color harmonies. The color harmonies provide you with examples of how individual colors in the palette can be mixed together and in what proportion or measure. The uniquely developed color bars which make up the color harmony accompany each highlighted color story.

We also strongly encourage you to explore each of these eight palettes on your own. Create your own combinations. Develop your own individualized color mixes. Imagine and invent. Experiment and express. And most importantly, have fun. There has never been a better time to be original and leave your very own colorful mark on the world.

PURPLE HAZE COLOR HARMONIES

Embodying calmness, a palette of hazy and smoky hues effortlessly commingle to create subtle blends and harmonies that are both timeless and time-honored.

KINDRED SPIRITS COLOR HARMONIES

Sitting side by side on the color wheel, this palette of like-minded hues with their spirited good humor and playful exuberance makes for easy and engaging color mixes.

DRAMA QUEEN COLOR HARMONIES

An unusual combination of show-stopping saturated color with rich and elegant earth tones creates an adventurous mood full of excitement and drama.

INTRIGUE COLOR HARMONIES

Invoking a sense of mystery, a palette of nature’s blues and greens, combined with the unconventional Ultra Violet and a Silver and Pale Gold metallic, exudes a quiet strength.

QUIETUDE COLOR HARMONIES

Soft and warm, a subtle palette of natural and organic shades accented by a Frosted Almond metallic evokes reassurance and conveys a sense of calm and quiet.

ATTITUDE COLOR HARMONIES

Exploding with zest and energy, this palette of pure, unadulterated color which screams “look at me” comes together to create a bold statement with feelings of excitement and high voltage effects.

DESERT SUNSET COLOR HARMONIES

Emulating a desert sunset, this is a dramatic palette of brilliantly heightened warm shades that radiate resplendently across the early evening sky.

FLORAL FANTASIES COLOR HARMONIES

Inspired by the colors we see in our surroundings, a combination of soft and sweet pastels with an enchanting Ultra Violet and a deep, dark navy Astral Aura conjures up a summer garden in full bloom.

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Color of the Year 2018 – Ultra Violet!

Pantone (the folks who assign color #s to paint among other things) has announced that the 2018 color of the year is Ultra Violet.

How beautiful is that!!!

This is what Leatrice Eiseman, the executive director of the pantone color institute says about the choice.

“We are living in a time that requires inventiveness and imagination.  It is this kind of creative inspiration that is indigenous to Pantone 18-383 Ultra Violet, a blue based purple that takes our awareness and potential to a higher level.  From exploring new technologies and the greater galaxy, to artistic expression and spiritual reflection, intuitive Ultra Violet lights the way to what is yet to come.”

Look to next weeks blog to see how to combine the color of the year with other colors.

Here are some violets from our stock!

Spectrum Deep Violet with Pale Purple Streaks Cathedral Waterglass

Blue and Violet Van Gogh Metallic Finish Glass

Purple and Violet Van Gogh Metallic Finish Glass

Bullseye Deep Royal Purple Fusible Glass 90 COE

Spectrum Grape Opal Waterglass SilverCoat Mirror

Spectrum Violet Cathedral Fusible 96 COE

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