EGGBEATER JESUS GLASS FALLING

This week I was waiting on customer who wants to do mosaic something that will be outside.  When she asked for the correct products, I could not help but think of this situation that was written about in the Fall and Winter 2017 issues Stained Glass magazine. (Info comes from there and an article in Alabama Living.)   All I could think of was “make sure it is weather proof!”  This amazing piece of art is located at the Huntsville, Alabama First Baptist Church.  It took seven years to complete (1966 to 1973) and contained approximately 1.4 millions pieces of Italian tile – none larger than a thumbnail.

This mosaic is giant!  There are seven bays and each bay is 18’x45’.  It is about 5,600 sq ft of mosaic.  It made the news because it was falling apart!  A team went in to asses the issues.  They determined the problems were: Glass tiles were used instead of smalti, (Smalti are ½-1/3 the size of tiles but twice as thick.  Smalti do have a beveled edge) the mounting of the tiles to a netting with epoxy was not the best method, the materials used were of dubious quality, the cements used to install the mosaic were not the best choice, and the methods used to apply the cement and mosaic sections were suspect and probably incorrect.  Within a year of the installation glass started to fall!  50 years later the team was trying to determine the best way to fix it.

The decision was made to remove the entire mosaic and replace it with new.  The design was to be reproduced and this time fabricated and installed correctly!  The color palette was to remain the same, but it was allow to increased the depth of color and make some minor corrections to the design.  This project is still going on.  At the time of the Winter issue of Stained Glass bay two was complete and Bay 3 was underway, schedule to be complete by Easter.

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If you have a difficult time adapting to change—LOOK OUT!  There will be so many changes in the upcoming months, it will make your head spin!  Oceanside made several announcements in July, 2018.  We have been passing this news directly on to you through our eblast which go out a few times during the week.  If you are not signed up for these and would like to be, click here:  https://www.stainedglassexpress.com/newsletters.html.

One announcement made was what would be retired July 1, 2018.  For that list, click here.  https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/3066318/art%20glass/96%20Transition/July%201st%202018%20Retired%20Products.pdf?t=1533154518844.  To help you understand this list a bit and not to get too upset.  A-100G does not mean clear granite is going away.  It means clear granite in large sizes is going away.  That is what the” A” in the front means.  Architectural.  The “I” in front of the next list means Iridized!  Yep—that is a long list of iridized.  Gone!  Spectrum was outsourcing coated glass and Oceanside is having logistical problems doing that because it means crossing borders and dealing with NAFTA.  Not easy.  So they are hoping that in 2019 they will buy the equipment and start production again.  The spoa number are the very beautiful opal arts. These:  Nautica, Godiva, Sour Apple

The next batch of numbers are Spirit glass numbers.  Again just beautiful Art Glass.  Rio, Valhalla, Sedona, Seattle.  (and they even had cool names!!)

 

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KEVIN’S PYRAMIDS

All this info comes from the Epilepsy Foundation site and note that the pyramids rights are protected.

I never had the privilege of knowing Kevin, but I know his mom, Patricia Barnes, and I have met his delightful brother and I have even helped clean the pyramids!  Trish made this incredible collection of pyramids (out of stained glass, of course) after the drowning death of Kevin when he was not quite 17.  These pyramids have been donated to the Epilepsy foundation for fundraising for epilepsy research and hopefully new therapies and strategies to improve the life of people living with seizures.  Money raised from the sale of the pyramids fund young researchers called “Kevin’s Fellows”.

 

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SIMAX

For a few years now, Stained Glass Express has been offering 33 coe glass.  We are still learning and still adding product.  One of the growing stock is our 33 coe tubes and rods.  We stock Simax tubes and rods made by Schott.  This is a high- quality borosilicate glass.  The main ingredients are silica and boron.  Boro has a high heat resistance and a low thermal expansion.  (thus the low coe number).

Simax works best in high heat and is commonly used in lab equipment, industrial equipment and cookware.  However, in our art world it is a favorite because it creates smoot, transparent and strong beautiful pieces.

For Simax to work at it’s full potential it must be annealed properly.  Annealing is the process of eliminating internal thermal stress.  This stress comes from one area of the glass getting hotter than a neighboring area and will later develop cracks.  Usually it is annealed at 1050 F for about one hour and then cooled slowly.  If you cool too quickly it will crack.  Of course, this can vary depending on the thickness of the glass and other variables.

You can use Simax glass with other 33 coe glass like Glass Alchemy, Golden Gate, imported, Momkas, Northstar, Tautman and others.

We have not put simax on our website but if you talk to us and allow us to cut it to fit a box (or are willing to pay for oversized we will ship it.  Our colored rods are on the site.   https://www.stainedglassexpress.com/flameworking_glassblowing/33-coe/

 

In the art world the top item made is tobacco pipes, but also ornaments, pendants and other wonderful works of art!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sign up for one of our torch room classes and learn this art!  https://www.stainedglassexpress.com/skins/common/images/TorchRoomClassesSchedule.pdf

 

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WISTERIA!

 


INFO FROM THE MORSE MUSEUM

This lamp is not only incredibly beautiful and an amazing amount of work, it was turning point for the Tiffany Studios.  In 1902, there was an event in Turin, Italy called the Prima Esposizione, Internazionale d’Arte Decorative Moderna.  This event put an emphasis on the aesthetic renewal of everyday objects.  Tiffany Studios received a grand prize at this event.  One of the designs for the award was for the Wisteria Library Lamp.  Electricity was now available.  Before electricity, the lamp bases had to serve as containers for oil and limited the design.  This transformed a previously utilitarian device in an electrified sculpture.

Take a close look at the top of the lamp.  There is an intricate bronze vine working its way down the design of the lamp.  Just beautiful.  This shade was designed by Clara Driscoll, who was the supervisor in the Women’s Glass Cutting Department.  Follow this link to learn more about Clara Driscoll.  http://morsemuseum.org/louis-comfort-tiffany/tiffany-studios-designers.

Wisteria has more than 2,000 pieces which, of course, were hand cut.  The wisteria was a popular spring blooming vine in the 19th-century American gardens and loved by Louis Comfort Tiffany.  He planted them in abundance at his Long Island estate called Laurelton Hall.

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WHICH SIDE IS THE COATED SIDE OF DICHROIC

Some Info from The Frog Blog

Dichroic glass is so beautiful and there are so many uses, it is just delightful.  However, there are a few problems that knowledge can help deal with.

One is that it is impossible to tell 96 from 90 COE if you get them mixed up.  The answer to this one is—DON’T mix them up.  Keep them labeled.  If you keep scrap, keep it in a well-marked box.

It is often important to know which side the dichroic coated side is to get the look you are going for.  If it has a dark base, no problem—you can see it.  However, on a transparent base, it can look the same on both sides!  Reasons you may want to know this?

Cutting.  Always cut on the non-coated side of the glass.  It will help prevent chipping, especially on textured glass.  It also saves your cutter.

Coated Side Down.  When using the coated side down or capped with clear glass, the dichroic glass will have a smooth glossy surface and sparkle like glitter.  It will also change colors between the transmitted color and a completely different reflective color, depending of the angle of view.

Coated Side Up.   If you use the dichroic glass with the coated side up or uncapped, the dichroic surface will have a highly metallic sheen.  The piece may additional be rough and textured depending on the type of dichroic glass you are using.

This is what to do.  Place the glass over a dark background.  Look at the glass at an angle so that you are seeing the reflection of the dichroic.  Touch the surface with a paperclip (don’t scratch it).  The paperclip will reflect.

To know your answer.  Does the reflection meet the paper clip, or there a gap between the clip and its reflection?

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HEARST CASTLE

In one of the articles I read about Oceanside Glass (the new owners of Specturm and Uroborus Glass) they mentioned that one of their first big breaks was getting to replicate the vintage tile for the Roman Pool at Hearst Castle.

This interested me on several levels.  One is that last year I saw the Roman Baths in Bath England.  A fascinating place.  Next was that in my mid 20s Patty Hearst was kidnapped.  I was riveted to the story.  Read the book and was totally on Patty’s side.  Then the glass!  How thrilling.

The article compared this big break to Eric Lovel and Uroboros getting to recreate Tiffany glass for restoration.  It also made me think of our early years in the glass business when we got the contract to make air control panels for a state funded program.  A lot of good steady work.  Certainly not as sexy as doing Tiffany or Hearst work but we were over the moon.  I asked my husband how he was going to make this product that was specific in its requirements.   “No idea.  I never saw anything like it, I don’t think it exists, but it is a great idea”.  So, he quizzed every sales person he could and found metal and a gasket that would work.  The metal came from a place called Mason (still in business) and the metal number was E208.  We named the air control panel an OPE208.  The OP was from Oakes & Parkhurst Glass, the name of our business (also still in business).  Many competitors tried to get in on that action but could never figure out where we were buying the ope208.  Little did they know we were manufacturing them ourselves.  They were inside panels, the gasket made them air tight.  We could make them with acrylic when they were for older people who might not be able to lift them with glass.  They were held on with clips that were hidden behind curtains.  Easy on and easy off!  We made thousands.  Days, nights, weekends.  One Thanksgiving afternoon our family helped so we would not miss a deadline since our employees (rightly so) wanted Thanksgiving off!  But I digress! 

This is a picture of the Roman Pool at Hearst Castle.  The tile patterns were inspired by mosaics found in the 5th Century Mausoleum of Galla Placidia in Ravenna, Italy.  Some also represent the marine monster themes that are in the ancient Roman baths.

The tiles are 1” square and go ceiling to floor.  These glass tiles, called smalti, are either mostly colored blue or orange or are clear with fused gold inside.

 

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POWERFUL FORCES OF NATURE

I just love this piece from the Glass Craft and Bead Expo.  The women represent Earth, Wind, Fire and Water.  I love the symbolism, I love that Bonnie used women (powerful forces of nature), I love the framing, and how “earth” is escaping the frame.

It is truly a great piece.  In my opinion a FIRST PLACE!

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ROOTS OF KNOWLEDGE…..Seriously—Prepare to be amazed!

In celebration of Utah Valley University’s 75th anniversary in November of 2016, they presented a public art project done in stained glass called Roots of Knowledge.

It is a very large permanent display.  Ten feet high and 200 feet in length.  The mural starts with the dawn of humanity and goes to the present time.  It includes ore than 60,000 pieces of glass and made up of 80 panels.

More than 40 professional artists, 26 UVU scholars and hundreds of UVU students work on the project under the guidance of Utah artist Tom Holdman and Utah Valley University President Matthew Holland.  The lead artist was Cameron Oskcarson.  Tom Holdman, a master stained glass artist was the brains behind the project. 

Want to see more?  https://www.uvu.edu/rootsofknowledge/

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KNOW YOUR GLASS—CORELLA CLASSIC

Corella Classic is made by Wissmach Glass.  Wissmach glass is the second oldest glass manufacturer that is still in operation. Corella Classic is one of their many lines of cathedral glass.

 

 

 

 

As always, glass is not the easiest to photograph so these don’t particularly show the special characteristics of Corella Classic.  Wissmach’s description is “In contrast to the more traditional and defined patterns, with Corella Classic the color flows across the non-directional pattern for that special illumination—A shimmering reflection of light from watery surface of glass.

On our website, Corella Classic is mixed in with the other cathedrals of Wissmach.  http://www.stainedglassexpress.com/Stained-Art-Glass/Wissmach-Glass-Art-Glass/Wissmach-Glass-Cathedral

In the store they are in their own section of the stock glass.

 

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