Stained Glass Dreamcatchers

STAINED GLASS DREAMCATCHERS

The Legend of the Dreamcatcher is that Native Americans of the Great Plains believe that the air is filled with both good and bad dreams.

According to legend, the good dreams pass through the center hold of a dream catcher and to the sleeping person.  The bad dreams are trapped in the web, where they perish in the light of dawn.

Historically, dreamcatchers were hung in the tipi or lodge and a baby’s cradle.

Make your own dreamcatcher.  Here are some useful items to help.

Click here to buy your own dreamcather bevel kit!

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Tips from the Glass Academy – ZYP HELPFUL HINTS

Good Grief!  Has there ever been a time more fraught with problems in our industry.  Manufacturers, distributors and retailers closing.  Never in my over 30 years in this business have I seen such a shortage of products.

Then last year there was the Boron Nitride dilemma.  Our regular source disappeared from the market and was replaced with Slide and ZYP.  Slide could not be used for all applications so we have had to use the very expensive ZYP.  Kudos to the manufacturers for trying to get the cost down.  Apparently, a fair amount of the cost of the product is because it came out in an aerosol.  Expensive to ship.  So just a month ago they came out with a pump spry.  Less expensive to ship, so less expensive in the market place.  We all jumped for it!

Then the complaints started!  It clogs!  Darn, darn, darn.  So here are some hints to help!

 

  1. Shake vigorously before each use.  (rock and roll music would be helpful in the background)
  2. Seal tightly after use.
  3. The water-based spray will take longer to dry than the solvent-based spray.
  4. To prevent clogging: wash pump sprayer with warm water when finished for the day.

Click here to purchase the ZYP Pump Spray!

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WORDEN CLOSING

It has been a sad year with our manufacturers having difficult times for different reasons.  Of course, the closing of Spectrum and Uroboros has been forefront in everyone’s mind since the announcement on May 11, 2016.  Thankfully the supply chain for Spectrum has now started to flow from Oceanside, the new owner.  We have not seen Uroboros back again and we have heard that Oceanside is having a difficult time with it and we may not see it for another year!

Last week when I ordered little brass filigree feet for jewelry boxes, I was told that manufacturer had closed.  I was pretty much a one-man operation and the man was in his 80s and not interested in continuing.  We received the last of what was available and they were copper not brass.  It is a nice little product and we are sad to see it go.

Now we have gotten sad news that Worden is closing.  In case you are not familiar with Worden they make a Styrofoam mold for Tiffany reproduction and tiffany type lamps.  They also produce and/or supply the patterns and the parts and pieces that go with the lamps–like filigrees and jewels.  The reason for this closing is this from their announcement.

“Why Close – Howard Worden passed away in the Spring of 2015.  The patented WordenSystem™ of stained glass lamp construction was his inspiration.  He designed the new patterns and products.  With his passing, the desire to continue with the H L Worden Co. was no longer there.

After we close the business, we cannot guarantee there will be another supplier of our products in the future.

Selling WordenSystem™ – We are currently looking for a buyer for our product line which includes instructions, patterns, molds, dies, copyrights, trademarks, accessories, etc. and remaining inventory.  If you are seriously interested, please contact us for further information.

Thank you  – Kathryn Worden and the staff at H L Worden Company say “thank you” for more than 42 years of patronage from our loyal customers.   We appreciate the many pictures and comments received from satisfied customers using the WordenSystem”

We still have some stock available.  If you are interested, please click on the link below.   We will also work hard to find you parts and pieces you may still want if we don’t have it in stock.  Just let us know and we will go on the hunt with our suppliers.  However, it does seem that they have been making this decision for the last year or so.  Supplies have already been hard to get.  We have not even been able to get their little catalog.

Click here for lamp supplies

There is another system called Odyssey Lamp System   that we will consider stocking when our stock is depleted.  It is very nice but more expensive than Worden.  The forms are made of fiberglass instead of Styrofoam so really are very durable.

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CHROMIUM IS THE NEW—NO– OLD—NO—NEW–GREEN!

The great news is that the Oregon Department of Environmental quality is allowing Bullseye Glass to once again use chromium in their manufacturing.  They can use it immediately.  (this is July 2017)

It will take a bit of time to build inventory levels and get them back in the supply chain but we will once again see.

Spring Green Opalescent BE012630f

Click here to purchase Spring Green!

Spring green transparent BE142630F

Click here to purchase Transparent Spring Green!

Aventurine Green BE111231F

Click here to purchase Aventurine Green!

Light Aventurine Green BE141230F

Click here to purchase Light Aventurine Green!

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Mosaics: Bringing Art out of the gallery and into the Subway

Mosaics: Bringing Art out of the gallery and into the Subway

By Melissa Bardsley

Our daily commute here in Maine is filled with scenic views of trees, bodies of water, and the occasional wildlife. We take these picturesque commutes for granted and forget that for a large part of the country their commute includes riding in public transportation which includes underground subways with no view. Some artists in New York City are looking to change that with their mosaic installations that are transforming utilitarian based spaces into a public works of art. Here are four examples of mosaic works in New York subway stations that might be able to persuade one to give up their picturesque commute for public transportation.

Delancey St – Essex St – Mosaic Created by Ming Fey

Fey Created watercolor sketches that were inspired by the marketplace that resides overhead that has been brought to life in this extensive glass tile mosaic.

Yankees – E. 153rd St – Mosaic Created by Ellen Harvey

            Harvey created an 11 panel mosaic inspired by photos and watercolor paintings of the south facing Bronx sky. The glass tiles replicate the transitional and iridescent quality of the sky as it progresses from a cloud filled day to star lit night.

34th St- Hudson Yards – Mosaic Created by Xenobia Bailey

            Bailey is traditionally a fiber artist focusing in mediums of crochet and textiles. Her designs are rich with colors and mandala like repetition.

Second Ave – Mosaics by Jean Shin, Vik Muniz, Chuck Close, and Sarah Sze

            Shin was inspired by archival photos of the Second and Third Ave elevated trains and replicated photos from when they were in operation.

Muniz has created over three dozen brightly colored portraits of New Yorkers in a collection titled ‘Perfect Strangers’.

Close created ten portraits of well-known subjects for the project part of a series titles ‘Subway Portraits’

            Sze’s mosaic spans a whopping 14,000 sq feet depicting sheets of paper, scaffolding, birds, trees, and foliage with interactions referencing energy fields and wind patterns.

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MOSAICS—FULL SPEED AHEAD

In this world of immediate gratification and just in general never having enough time, it is great to find something that will speed up a process.  In our Glass Academy, we were thrilled when we found this product.  It enables us to have a class where we can do a mosaic from start to finish in one sitting without being frustrated with the glass moving around because the glue has not set up yet.

This little miracle product is No Days Mosaic Adhesive and Mesh.

For an overview, watch this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oreV4CFfRt8&index=1&list=PL7EBF342B0C7DF5EA

 

We have these products on our website.  Note the Mosaic adhesive is available in white, black and pewter.  Links to each are below.

http://www.stainedglassexpress.com/no-days-groutless-mosaic-adhesive.html

http://www.stainedglassexpress.com/no-days-groutless-mosaic-adhesive-black.html

http://www.stainedglassexpress.com/no-days-groutless-mosaic-adhesive-pewter.html

http://www.stainedglassexpress.com/no-days-mosaic-mesh-sheet-12-x-48.html

 

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BORN IN FIRE—FUELED BY IMAGINATION

BORN IN FIRE—FUELED BY IMAGINATION

The Transformation and Rebirth of Uroboros Glass

This just could not be more exciting.  Last May when the Glass almost died and a lot of thought it had, was a real time of scrambling around to keep glass on the shelves.  Now the anticipation of a steady supply chain is just so uplifting!

The Uroboros image of the dragon consuming its own tale is a symbol of nature’s infinite cycle.  One thing ending and another beginning.

So here we go!!!

https://vimeo.com/223705522

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Tips from the Glass Academy: PRIMING MOLDS

Molds must be primed and it is more complicated than ever.  There are primers for steel molds and primers for textured molds.  It is important that you know what you are using and that you use the right thing.  Expense works into this also.  Some are quite expensive.

Always wear a mask and read the directions carefully.

When using a spray can always hold the can vertically, ten to twelve inches from the mold.

 

Primo Primer

Click here to purchase Primo Primer

For shelf and molds.  Lasts for multiple firings.  Can be used with some casting molds including Colour de Verre casting molds.  This is a powder that must be mixed with water.

 

Hi-Fire Shelf Primer

Click here to purchase Hi-Fire Shelf Primer

Designed for higher temperatures for raking and as a coating for mandrels for bead making.

 

Slide Hi-Temp 1800

Click here to purchase Slide Hi-Temp 1800

This is made with Boron Nitride.  Idea for stainless steel molds.  NOT recommended for casting or ceramic molds.  This is an aerosol so it is very easy to use.  There is no need to preheat the metal mold before applying.  This is NOT recommended for Creative Paradise molds

 

ZYP

Click here to purchase ZYP

This can go up to 1800 degrees F.  With the stainless steel and ceramic mold.  This is the one to use with intricately detailed molds that Colour de Verre and Creative Paradise puts out. This spray results in superior casings.  No spurs or sharp edges and leaves a beautiful shiny surface.

 

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Tips from the Glass Academy: How To Cut Murrini Without Having Flying Glass

How To Cut Murrini Without Having Flying Glass

This great idea comes from Glacial Art Glass

Clip-weeeww-clatter-roll…

How do you cut murrini without hearing these sounds? The very simple method you are about to learn will show you how to:

  • Cut murrini without chasing your glass slices across the room.
  • Avoid breathing the dust created when cutting.
  • Keep all those tiny shards and chips of glass from getting everywhere.
  • Have your cane and cutting tool clearly visible and freely mobile so that you can get consistently good quality murrini slices.

Note that this method is very cheap, easy to set up, and can be used to cut other small pieces of glass with a pair of mosaic cutters or ceramic tile nippers.

Here we go:
You’ll need a few things besides your murrine cane and cutters.

– A cheap snap and seal plastic baggie.
– 4 Safety pins or Binder clips.
– Scissors

 

When it comes to plastic bags, go for the cheapest, thinnest sandwich bags, at about 6 ½ inches by 5 7/8 inches. Of course, whatever you have on hand will probably work, but the cheap sandwich bags are the right size, and thinner plastic (think generic store-brand vs. the sturdier ziplock brand) seems to stay clear longer. Over time any bag will lose clarity due to dust, abrasions, and wrinkles, so that you will unfortunately have to throw them away and start with a new one occasionally. But you can cut a lot of murrini with just one bag.

Step one: Put the cutting end of your tool into the bag, with the handles sticking out, and seal the bag around the handles. It’s not necessary to get a complete seal, just try to keep the two sides of the bag lined up to reduce gaps. You don’t need a lot of the tool in the bag, it’s more important to keep as much of the handles sticking out as possible.

Step two: Secure the seal, including between the handles, with safety pins or binder clips. If you are using safety pins, run each pin along the edge of the bag, not perpendicular to it. Binder clips need to be sufficiently small that they don’t impede the cutting motion. The one securing the section between handles is most likely to get in the way, so opt for the smallest one you can get here. While cutting you’ll notice that there is still a slight gap around each handle. This is fine as long as murrine slices wont readily work out of the bag.

Step three: Cut a slit in the bag where you will need to insert the murrine cane. Cut a corner off the bag from where you will be able to pour your slices out. You will have more control over short pieces of murrine cane or other small pieces of glass if you can hold them with your fingers directly, even though they might not be protruding from the bag. The most effective way to enable this is to make the holes big enough to fit a forefinger and thumb through with the glass.

A few final tips:
While cutting, keep the corner hole clipped or pinned shut. If murrini slices begin to get in the way of the cutting tool movement, shake them into the corner, away from the tool.  When you get ready to pour the murrine out of the bag, dust, though you may not see it, will be coming out too. Take care not to breath this in.

This great idea comes from Glacial Art Glass

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WHAT THE HECK IS A BAGHOUSE!!!

Since February of 2016 we have been hearing the term Baghouse.  It started with Oregon’s Department of Environmental Quality shutting down several colors (which represent several chemicals) because they were polluting.  This first shutdown was at Bullseye Glass Manufacturing plant in Oregon.

Bullseye has since installed several Baghouse pollution controls on their furnaces. 

By October of 2016 they had 18 installed at a significant cost which we have seen passed down in the cost of glass.  The cost from Blogtown written by Daniel Frobes says it is between $500,000 and $1,200,000.  I think what they are saying is $100,000 per baghouse!

From the issue with Bullseye all the major manufacturers of art sheet glass and rods were investigated by the EPA.   We saw all opal reds, yellow, orange, green and some black disappear from production.

Bullseye installed their baghouses and resumed production.  Uroboros decided not to continue because of the large investment required and the age of the owner.  They have since been sold to Oceanside Glass & Tile but manufacturing has not resumed yet.

Spectrum already had a baghouse equipment on its primary color furnaces.  Below is a picture of it.  As you can see, it is no small deal!  The basic operation is:

  1. Furnace exhaust enters the baghouse via a system of ductwork.
  2. The exhaust travels through a series of filtering bags within the structure to filter out particulates. The particulates are then knocked off the bags by compressed air-pulsed jets.  It falls down the hopper and collected in a sack.  The filtered air is then released through an exhaust duct.

The lower portion of the structure contains the collector sack.  The “super sack” is disposed of by a certified waste-services company.

Even though Spectrum already had this technology in place they were operating in a plant that was at 40% capacity and not doing financially well because of that.  They decided that with increased testing and reporting requirements that they did not want to continue.  They too have been sold to Oceanside and we believe at this point, manufacturing testing is going on and we will see Spectrum glass hit the warehouses once again this summer.

Oceanside has also installed baghouse technology.

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